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Sterling, Dorothy. Lucretia Mott. ISBN If our principles are right, why should we be cowards? The world has never yet seen a truly great and virtuous nation, because in the degradation of women, the very fountains of life are poisoned at their source. I have no idea of submitting tamely to injustice inflicted either on me or on the slave.

Lucretia Mott (1793-1880)

I will oppose it with all the moral powers with which I am endowed. I am no advocate of passivity. Let her [woman] receive encouragement for the proper cultivation of all her powers, so that she may enter profitably into the active business of life. Liberty is not less a blessing, because oppression has so long darkened the mind that it can not appreciate it.

Lucretia Mott | American Battlefield Trust

I grew up so thoroughly imbued with women's rights that it was the most important question of my life from a very early day. My conviction led me to adhere to the sufficiency of the light within us, resting on truth for authority, not on authority for truth. We too often bind ourselves by authorities rather than by the truth.


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  • It is time that Christians were judged more by their likeness to Christ than their notions of Christ. Were this sentiment generally admitted we should not see such tenacious adherence to what men deem the opinions and doctrines of Christ while at the same time in every day practise is exhibited anything but a likeness to Christ. It is not Christianity, but priestcraft that has subjected woman as we find her.

    Quakers in the World

    The cause of Peace has had my share of efforts, taking the ultra non-resistance ground -- that a Christian cannot consistently uphold, and actively support, a government based on the sword, or whose ultimate resort is to the destroying weapons. Her courage is no merit, one almost says, where triumph is so sure. Continue Reading. He set up business with Lucretia's father in Philadelphia.

    At the age of 28 Mott became a Quaker minister, and when the denomination divided over matters of doctrine she supported the liberal, or Hicksite, faction. The Motts were abolitionists, and their home became a station on the Underground Railroad, by which Southern slaves escaped to the North. Mott helped found the first antislavery society for women in , and later, with other militant abolitionist women, helped William Lloyd Garrison take over the American Antislavery Society.

    Sine as Lucretia Mott

    Although Mott was a radical abolitionist, she was not a typical agitator. At a time when the causes of woman's rights and abolition attracted vivid personalities, she was outstanding for her gentle manners and disarmingly soft ways. She was a beloved figure, especially because her sweet character was complemented by unswerving dedication to principle.

    In Mott was one of a band of women who accompanied Garrison to London for a world antislavery convention.

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    The orthodox Quakers and English abolitionists who dominated the meeting refused to seat them, fearing the convention would seem ridiculous if females participated. Garrison, who sat with the rejected women in the gallery, noted the contradiction in having a convention to abolish slavery "and at its threshold depriving half the world of their liberty. At the convention Mott met the young Elizabeth Cady Stanton, who attended it with her husband. Their friendship developed, although both were busy wives and mothers, and Mott was involved in promoting peace, temperance, and abolition along with woman's rights.

    Mott thought its resolution asking for woman's suffrage to be too far in advance of public opinion. Born Lucretia Coffin on January 3, , in Nantucket, Massachusetts, Lucretia Mott was a women's rights activist, abolitionist, and religious reformer.

    A child of Quaker parents, Mott grew up to become a leading social reformer. At the age of 13, she attended a Quaker boarding school in New York State. Mott stayed on and worked there as a teaching assistant. While at the school, she met her future husband James Mott. The couple married in and lived in Philadelphia.

    Further Reading on Lucretia Coffin Mott

    By , Mott became a Quaker minister, noted for her speaking abilities. She and her husband went over with the more progressive wing of their faith in Mott was strongly opposed to slavery and advocated not buying the products of slave labor, which prompted her husband, always her supporter, to get out of the cotton trade around An early supporter of William Lloyd Garrison and his American Anti-Slavery Society, she often found herself threatened with physical violence due to her radical views.

    Mott and her husband attended the famous World's Anti-Slavery Convention in London in , the one that refused to allow women to be full participants. This led to her joining Elizabeth Cady Stanton in calling the famous Seneca Falls Convention in New York in at which, ironically, James Mott was asked to preside , and from that point on she was dedicated to women's rights and published her influential "Discourse on Woman"